Exhibition at the Kooywood Gallery, Cardiff. June 5th-27th

Hedgerow Sun

Hedgerow Sun; oil on board, 20 x 20 cm

Floralise 15x15 cm

Floralise 15×15 cm

Inner Hillside

Inside the Hill oil on board 20x20cms

Near Tregaron 20x20cm

Near Tregaron oil on board 20x20cms

Preseli Sun oil on board 20x20cms

Preseli Sun oil on board 20×20 cms

Stormy Coast

Stormy Coast; oil on board, 13x18cm

The Alpilles

The Alpilles; oil on board, 13×18 cm

Field beyond the Garden

Field beyond the Garden; oil on board, 13×18 cm

 

These are just a few of the new paintings which I showed at the Kooywood Gallery in June. The gallery is at 8, Museum Place, Cardiff, and is open Tuesday-Saturday 11.30 to 6 pm. They now have a selection of work in the Gallery – phone Rhian on 02920 235093

Reviews

Review of Exhibition at Oriel Q 2004

The miniature is not normally the chosen mode of a landscape painter, but here it has reached far and achieved the status of a religious icon – work for serious contemplation. They are almost jewels. For someone who puts too much in too large a canvas, this is a welcome step. The influence on this group of paintings are vast. If we leave out the Blue Rider in the larger works, the amalgam of Paul Klee and Samuel Palmer creates a unique genre of miniature landscapes. There is something very interesting here.

Geoff Yeomans

Review of Gallery on the Usk Show 2012

Elizabeth’s studio is embedded in the Pembrokeshire  landscape, the ancient fields , the wild stony outcrops, the sharp coastline which make Pembrokeshire so different from Breconshire.

Going there is a Narnian Experience…first into the small wooden shed, densely packed with the paraphernalia of an artist but then this opens into a larger space with a great window out on to the landscape and finally through this one enters a great space, I think formerly a cattle shed but now subdivided into fascinating and delightful spaces, for teaching, for playing, for performing for relaxing for studying.

In some ways her paintings are like this too… you can enter them on a simple level, relishing colours and textures, enjoying apparently inconsequential marks, but from these emerge a larger space and deeper forms, sometimes there are hints of mountains and forests,  intimations of buildings and trees  and the further you go into the picture the more there is to see.

Elizabeth has lived in Pembrokeshire for over 40 years and her work has gradually become more abstract , more suggestive more mysterious..   but she is still working in the great British tradition of the landscape, reading and interpreting  nature and returning it to the viewer enriched.

William Gibbs

Painting in St Remy and Avignon

For the last fortnight of October, Dick and I travelled to Avignon and St Remy de Provence; we drew every day. We visited was the Asylum of St Paul de Mausole, where Van Gogh was a patient for a year in 1889-90, and where he completed over a hundred paintings. This was an extraordinary and moving experience.

We saw the Alpilles from afar in Avignon, these steep limestone crags rise steeply from behind the Asylum; from our hotel window we looked straight up at them.  Since coming home I’ve developed a number of paintings on this theme.

Les Alpilles, sunset

Les Alpilles, sunset

The Alpilles from St Remy

Les Alpilles from St Remy

 

St Paul de Mausole

St Paul de Mausole

Persimmon tree in the Asylum garden

Persimmon tree in the Asylum garden

 

The Asylum garden

Olives at St Paul

Olives at St Paul

 

Provencal Landscape

Provencal Landscape

Far Mountains

Far Mountains

Olives under the Alpilles

Olives under the Alpilles

Save

Drawings and watercolours of the Wakhi shepherds

I must have watched the first episode of Kate Humble’s Wild Shepherdess at least a dozen times, so absorbed did I become in the story of these heroic people. I sometimes think that a Preseli hill farm is wild in the winter – in January the Highland cows had icicles hanging from their ears – but that was nothing to the hardships endured by the Wakhi in the High Pamir.

So I began to draw and paint them from images on the screen, using a sketchbook as I would have done on the spot; here are a few of the results. I’m hoping to show more of them at MOMA in September.

Approaching the Wakhan Valley

Approaching the Wakhan

 

The valley

The valley

 

The sheep

The sheep

The yaks

The yaks and a small child

A shepherd

A shepherd

A dealer

A dealer

 

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Bakht Begum

 

By the lake

By the lake

 

The High Pamir

The High Pamir

 

Philosophy through Art Workshop at the Dragon School

Workshop with the Dragon School post exam group, April 23rd 2013

The theme of this workshop, in my series Philosophy through Art, was the question ‘What is an Artist?’

We started by asking the question ‘What is Philosophy?’ ‘It’s about asking questions to which there aren’t really any answers….’ was one immediate response; then, in answer to ‘What is an artist?’ there were several interesting comments, which included observations on music and poetry. We talked about how all the arts are in a tradition, new generations either developing or reacting against their predecessors, and whether or not art is a language.

We then looked at a set of images of animals in art from 30,000 years BC to the present day, and the children put them in order, working in groups. All kinds of interesting topics emerged as we did this – do the arts get better – is a Stubbs horse ‘better’ than one from Lascaux? How has the artist used the material? What about the patron (if any) as opposed to having a free hand? Where does self expression come in?

Then we sat very still, relaxing completely, and everybody looked at one picture. They made a copy of it in pencil. Then a copy from memory, then one with eyes shut and lastly one with eyes shut and using the ‘other’ hand. This was a fascinating experiment in visual thinking, and it was interesting that almost everyone preferred their last drawing.

These youngsters were a treat to work with, very bright and enthusiastic.

Copy of P1110447                                                              Copy of Copy of P1110447     Copy of P1110448Copy of Copy of P1110448

 

The “Philosophy in Art” workshop was both highly informative and revealing. It was delivered in a very calm but authoritative manner, where the children felt empowered to offer their ideas and thoughts on a range of concepts around the history of art and the evaluation of artworks. The practical element was also excellent and really made the pupils consider their own concepts and perceptions about their own and other people’s art.

Luke Osmond, Head of Art, DragonSchool

 

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